Relieve Menopausal Mood Swings

Natural Ways To Relieve Menopausal Mood Swings

When Does menopause

"officially" occur?

Menopause “officially” occurs after a woman has not experienced a menstrual cycle for at least a year. It can take several years of pre-menopausal symptoms for menopause to actually occur, and the post-menopause phase can last for several years after that. This means that menopause, and its symptoms, can last 2-10 years – or even longer. 

If you’re reading this, you have probably either tried or are concerned about invasive methods of relieving menopause symptoms – such as hormone therapy – and are looking for more natural options.

As you cycle through menopause, your estrogen and progesterone levels fluctuate dramatically, causing symptoms such as hot flashes, insomnia, depression, and mood swings. Hormonal changes can also cause physical symptoms, such as breast pain, loss in bone density, hair loss, and more.  All hormones are in flux during this amazing time of a woman’s life; they should all be considered in a comprehensive treatment plan.

Hormonal mood swings can be especially debilitating as they can result in anger or frustration, irritability, depression, and anxiety that last the duration of menopause.

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Thankfully, mood swings are not particularly common in menopausal women – only about 23% will experience such symptoms. But, this is still one in five.  For those that do experience menopausal mood swings, the experience can be disheartening. These affect not just you, but also your family and friends.  If you are suffering from mood swings, here are a few natural ways you may potentially relieve some of your symptoms:

  1. Taking Vitamin D3. Vitamin D3 is an excellent vitamin for menopausal women to incorporate into their diets, as it is linked to improving bone density as well as improving mood. An English study showed that Vitamin D3 deficiency was linked to depression in a group of adults ages 65 years or older. The best way to get Vitamin D3 is through safe amounts of sun exposure, and in your regular diet. Be sure to include fish products such as sardines and tuna, eggs, or fortified dairy products. Obviously, safe sun exposure is recommended; however, the use of sunscreen has its own health concerns.  Vitamin D3 is actually a hormone and has been found to regulate and change many different functions of the body.  Nervous system and brain function are significantly affected by Vitamin D3; thus its importance for mood.

  2. Acupuncture is something that many women use to find relief from their menopause symptoms. Skeptics of the practice argue that acupuncture is just a placebo, however, most insurance plans now cover acupuncture treatments. This is because there is a large body of evidence that has made it obvious that this works.  Acupuncture may be a helpful alternative to hormone therapy, but you should consult with your physician before starting an acupuncture treatment. Additionally, choose a practitioner that is well-trained and has been certified by the appropriate regulatory bodies. 

  3. Meditation. Beginning a yoga practice, or taking just a few minutes to meditate during the day can be very helpful in reducing your anxiety. You can also try the 4-7-8 Rule: This method of meditation is a simple and fast way to find relief from anxiety. Breathe in for four seconds, hold your breath for seven, and exhale slowly for eight. After a few breath cycles, your heart rate should be much slower and anxiety levels should drop.  Mindfulness is integral to proper brain health and psychological optimization; meditation is one way to become mindful.

  4. Try herbal remedies. St. John’s Wort is a popular herb used to relieve mood swings, improve sleep, promote calm, and reduce anxiety and depression. St. John’s Wort can be found in most pharmacies – it can be taken in pill or liquid form, or brewed in tea.  This herb is now even recommended by some Western Medical societies as a good first line treatment of general depression. There are side-effects and concerns and this remedy should be discussed with your provider.  

Well Theory: a Better Way to Wellness

a surgeon developed solution that’s different

Remember, simply understanding the process of menopause and accepting that you will have mood swings is often enough treatment in and of itself.  

Natural treatments and lifestyle changes are often effective in lieu of invasive treatments, like surgery, hormone replacement therapy, and others. Dr. Meredith Warner, orthopedic surgeon and founder of Well Theory, uses this methodology – patient-led, natural healing – whenever it is appropriate for their particular circumstance or condition, and founded Well Theory with this idea in mind.

You can find more natural methods of relieving menopause symptoms by reading our free Menopause Guide!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE

Age Vibrantly With Metformin

Age Vibrantly With Metformin

Hi, Dr. Meredith Warner here -

I am a board-certified and fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon who is passionate about helping you live well mentally, physically, and emotionally.

Aging is not considered a disease by the CDC, Federal Government or the FDA. However, there are a lot of problems associated with aging that need to be fixed.

I see the symptoms of age in my clinical practice every day – joint inflammation and stiffness, loss of bone mass, chronic pain and inflammation, and more. I am always looking for new ways to better serve my patients who are suffering from age-related conditions, and want to share such an option with you today.

Slow Down DNA Degradation

Metformin is drug that is usually prescribed for diabetes; however, it is finding new life as a way to combat the ravages of aging.

Metformin is in a class of medications called ‘M-Tor inhibitors.’ This basically means that it helps to stop the degradation of DNA over time. This reduces chromosomal abnormalities and has the potential to help people age better, and with less pain.

This drug modulates a cell protein important for division and growth. Essentially, metformin, when dosed correctly, can be protective and reduce DNA malformations. Research is still ongoing about metformin being used in this circumstance, but so far, it has been promising.

By using metformin, we can mimic the effects of intermittent fasting on the cells. Many studies have shown that periodic fasting, under the supervision and guidance of a doctor, can prolong a healthy, functional life and promote overall health. Since metformin mimics the effects intermittent fasting has on your body, it is highly protective of the cell’s integrity and youthfulness.

Potentially, aging patients may be able to use metformin to mimic the effects of intermittent fasting. This is especially helpful for aging patients who are unable to fast due to other conditions or dietary requirements. Used alongside other anti-aging solutions, supplements, and more, metformin could be a powerful adjunct medication with the potential to slow down the damaging effects that aging has on cellular degradation. This theory is being tested with a human trial.

Alter Your Genes -

for the better

In addition to mimicking the effects of intermittent fasting, metformin could alter gene expression as well. Epigenetics – what determines your cell’s specialization, their use, and more – could also be altered for the better with metformin. DNA can be changed with poor diet, bad lifestyle, environmental toxins and stress. This process is called methylation – essentially, the scarring of the DNA that accumulates and occurs with age and other outside stimuli.

Harnessing the power of epigenetics can potentially change methylation patterns for the better, such as slowing down aging or adapting the body’s inflammation response.

As the medical community finds ways to combat the symptoms of aging, creative and exciting options have revealed themselves through research. The Well Theory team and I are dedicated to finding new and alternative ways for you to live a more vibrant life with less pain as you age.

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Choose Well Theory for resources on full body betterment and products to bolster your wellness so that you can live to your fullest potential.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE

Improve Sleep During Menopause

Holistic Habits You Can Use To Improve Sleep During Menopause

Common menopause symptoms include

mood swings, hot flashes, and insomnia

The most commonly known symptoms of menopause include mood swings and hot flashes. However – other symptoms that are lesser known, such as insomnia, impact your quality of life just as much. In fact, insomnia can be more damaging than other, more common symptoms because sleep is an essential part of a healthy, balanced life.

Sleep is essential for many bodily functions to behave normally. From maintaining the health of your immune system, to consolidating memories, to wound healing and more, getting an average of 7-9 hours of sleep is a must for a healthy body - especially as you age. Sleep is very important for brain health as well.

As your hormone levels change with menopause, it can directly impact how much sleep you’re getting at night, and the quality of sleep as well. If you wake up often during the night, your body is less likely to fall into a deep sleep, when most of the healing functions of rest happen.

Hormone replacement therapy

vs natural options

There are several options you can incorporate to lessen the impact of menopause symptoms. One of these options is HRT (hormone replacement therapy.) Although well within the standard of care, many women have concerns about HRT and prefer to use natural options.  That being said, HRT is still the standard of care for most menopause conditions; it is very effective is used properly.

An alternative treatment for most menopausal symptoms, not just insomnia, may be found in consuming soy products (tofu, soybeans, and soymilk.) Soy products contain phytoestrogens, a plant-based hormone that is similar to estrogen. Other phytoestrogens are available as supplements, such as ginseng, red clover, and black cohosh.

To specifically target insomnia, making small lifestyle
changes can have a big impact.

And often as we age, our appetites decrease. The best way to efficiently absorb nutrients is naturally, through our diets – but with less food intake, you receive fewer vitamins and minerals. This loss of appetite combined with slower bone replacement – which happens naturally as you age – make supplements that specifically support bone health essential for avoiding fractures and maintaining your quality of life.

tips TO CONSIDER WHEN

combatting sleeplessness

Try to not consume large meals or alcohol several hours before bed. Foods that are spicy or acidic may trigger hot flashes, which can keep you up later due to discomfort. Wear light pajamas to bed, and layer several light blankets on your bed instead of a single heavy one, so you can toss one of two away if you find you’re overheated.  Remember that the optimal temperature for sleep is 65-67-degrees Fahrenheit.

Many menopausal women experience weight gain as their hormones fluctuate – and this can contribute to sleep apnea. Sleep apnea affects your breathing and therefore the quality of your sleep. If you think you’re experiencing symptoms of sleep apnea – waking often, snoring, etc., it is important to visit your doctor, who may order a sleep study as part of your treatment plan.

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Reduce the overall amount of screentime you engage in on a daily basis, and try out blue light-blocking glasses. The blue light that computers, television, Kindles and phone screens generate can signal to the body that it shouldn’t start producing melatonin, your body’s natural sleeping hormone, and can interrupt your circadian rhythm. You can also supplement melatonin to help you fall asleep faster and stay asleep. Melatonin does not work for everyone, but everyone should limit the amount of blue light exposure to the eyes at night.

Deciding what treatments you should start to combat your menopause symptoms should be part of a conversation you have with your physician. Some supplements may interact negatively with certain medications you are taking or may not be ideal for someone with your medical history. 

For more natural tips on relieving menopause and its symptoms, download our free Menopause Guide today!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE

Why Dr. Warner Cares

Why Dr. Warner Cares

Dr. Warner Here -

I am a board-certified and fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon who is passionate about helping you live well mentally, physically, and emotionally.

Today, about 16% of the US population is over the age of 65. This will increase to about 21% by 2035. This means that 1 in 5 will be Medicare age. In 1960, one could expect to live until age 79. Now, one can expect to live until age 85 – meaning that if you are 75 today, you can expect to live until the age of 87.

Since we are expected to live to the age of 87, would it not be nice if we aged vibrantly and gracefully?

The Science Behind

aging gracefully

At Well Theory, we are concerned with both how to live longer and how to live better.

Humans seemed to have plateaued in terms of aging to the mid-80s. That is, we can’t seem to get into the 90s and 100s without difficulty.

There is a lot of work being done in anti-aging. Most of this work comes from companies like Well Theory in terms of product development and research. But now, ‘big-pharma’ and their lobbyists want to become involve in the anti-aging movement.

Previously, this was ignored by the larger corporations. Today, there is research being done into patented compounds that isolate single molecules for mass-manufacturing. Rapamycin compounds, sirtuins, senolytics and even metformin are being looked to for abilities to help us age longer.

Although Mark Zuckerberg has stated that ‘young people are smarter’ than older ones, the data does not support this. Most successful start-ups are actually started by those who are middle-aged. Hopefully, a longer and better life will let them reap the rewards of their considerable efforts.

Simple Everyday Tips

to age gracefully

  1. Exercise at least 30 minutes a day. Walking, yoga, and swimming are great ways to maintain your physical health. Find a form of exercise you enjoy, and you’ll be more likely to stick to your new routine.

  2. Drink lots of water. As we get older, our sensation of thirst decreases, but it is especially important to get 6-8 glasses of water a day as dehydration is a serious risk. Mix it up with a glass of juice for vitamin C, or a natural flavor additive.

  3. Don’t smoke. Smoking increases your risk of lung cancer and leads to chronic fatigue as your lungs struggle to take in air. This can interrupt your exercise routine and affect not just your pulmonary health.

  4. Laugh! Studies have shown that laughter can get your body to produce endorphins – thereby reducing pain and improving your mood. Curate a lifestyle that gives you many opportunities to experience joy! 

  5. Eat just a little less sugar than you do today. Building a better lifestyle for yourself doesn’t happen overnight. Incorporate new, small habits that improve your overall well-being every day. 

“My goal is to help people age better, age fitter, and enjoy their old age. We’re all going to get old. You can’t stop that

Meredith Warner, MD

Live Vibrantly With

The Well Theory

Our goal at Well Theory is to help you live longer, better. Because, as we know, you absolutely will live longer in this country. Now, it is important to remain vibrant and functional. We want betterment physically, spiritually and mentally. Longevity is more than just long life – it is a better and longer life. That is what we are about.

Choose Well Theory for resources on full body betterment and products to bolster your wellness so that you can live to your fullest potential.

Dr. Meredith Warner

Orthopedic Surgeon

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE

Menopause & Your Metabolism

How Menopause Slows Your Metabolism

Menopause starts in three stages:

perimenopause, menopause, and post-menopause

Menopause happens in three stages – perimenopause, menopause, and post-menopause. During these three stages, hormone levels drop and/or fluctuate, and symptoms including hot flashes, insomnia, mood swings, and weight gain can happen. On average, menopause can last anywhere from 2-10 years – with symptoms prevalent throughout.

Because metabolism is affected by these hormonal changes, many women find that they begin to gain weight during this time. The metabolic process includes all of the biochemical reactions in your body that utilize things like nutrients and oxygen to create energy. There are many different factors that can impact how quickly or slowly your metabolism “works.” This metabolic rate is measured in calories.

In several animal studies, estrogen is linked to helping control body weight. Lab animals tend to eat more and be less physically active when they have lower estrogen. This reduced estrogen may lower the resting metabolic rate – or the rate at which the body converts energy when it is at rest and not exercising. It’s possible that the same thing happens in humans during menopause, when estrogen levels drop.

risks of lowered metabolism

When women are younger, the body tends to collect weight around the hips and thighs, called gynoid fat distribution. As menopause hits, women begin to gain weight around their midsection – weight that can be stubborn to shed. This redistribution can also affect pulmonary and cardiovascular health, increasing risk of strokes, heart attacks, and more.  More truncal fat than gynoid fat is thought to be worse for overall health.

Weight gain is associated with sleep apnea as well, which is a condition that makes it difficult to breathe deeply while sleeping and affects your quality of sleep. Rest is essential to many functions of the body – most notably immune system function, which can make you susceptible to illness.  Energy and cellular function are heavily dependent upon the detoxification that takes place during restful sleep. Hormone changes not only change weight, but also sleep patterns themselves.

Learn more about how to improve sleep during menopause by reading this helpful blog!

how to combat lowered

metabolism and weight gain

A lack of sleep can also contribute to weight gain. Avoid heavy meals and blue light screens in the evenings, and try to get between 7-9 hours of sleep each night. It is not cool or proof of being a hard-worker if you sleep less than 7 hours.  If your sleep doesn’t improve with basic sleep hygiene, consult a sleep specialist who may order a sleep study to treat any underlying causes of your insomnia.

Diversify your workout routine. Novelty can make exercise more enjoyable, so switch up your routine regularly. Try adding light weights when you’re out for a walk, or trying an exercise class or two at your local gym. Adding strength training to a cardio workout will help your body build more lean muscle mass, which in turn raises your resting metabolic rate – aka, the amount of calories you burn every day even without exercise.

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Well Theory: a Better Way to Wellness

a surgeon developed multi that’s different

Changing your diet is also a great way to introduce nutrient dense and lower calorie foods. A 2016 study found that a Mediterranean diet was effective in promoting long-term weight loss. Mediterranean diets are largely plant-based – high in healthy fats like olive oil; they feature low intake of red meat, and promote intake of whole grains, lean fish or poultry, and fruits and vegetables. It’s important to not simply cut calories, as bone loss happens more quickly as you get older, so you should continue to take in essential vitamins and minerals.  A diet is only helpful if you still eat and drink the necessary vitamins, minerals, collagens and other substances needed for proper cellular function.

“My goal is to help people age better, age fitter, and enjoy their old age. We’re all going to get old. You can’t stop that

Meredith Warner, MD

Our Bone & Joint Multivitamin was designed by orthopedic surgeon Dr. Meredith Warner according to the recommendations she makes to her own patients every day. Designed for surgical patients seeking to optimize their overall health, but ideal for sourcing all the essential vitamins and minerals you need for excellent connective tissue health, this multivitamin is a great option to ensure you’re filling gaps in your diet and to promote overall wellness at the same time.

Curate Your Wellness Regimen

There are many things you can do to lessen the symptoms of menopause, however, there are other changes that are simply a part of aging. At Well Theory, we’re dedicated to helping you age vibrantly – from our Herbal Kitchen cooking show, to our helpful resources, surgeon-designed products, and more. Consult with your physician about how you can create a plan to age with grace, and start living well today!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE

What is Herbal Medicine?

What Is Herbal Medicine?

What Is Herbal Medicine

and where does it originate from?

The origin of herbal medicine is tied back to the start of mankind itself. There is evidence of the use of medicinal plants in some of the earliest forms of the written word, and likely before that. There are strong ties between herbal medicines, food, religion and even what would become more “traditional” medicines.

Ancient Roots

Mesopotamia and Egypt. The written study of herbs dates back over 5,000 years when we see Sumerians’ clay tablets with lists of hundreds of medicinal plants like myrrh and opium. In Egypt, there are studies of “diseases of the skin” and there is written information on over 850 plant medicines, including garlic, juniper, cannabis, castor bean, aloe, and mandrake. Treatments were mainly aimed at ridding the patient of the most prevalent symptoms because the symptoms of the disease were incorrectly regarded as the disease itself.

India and China. India’s system of “ayurveda” medicine has used many herbs such as turmeric possibly as early as this  system. Many other herbs and minerals used in Ayurveda were later described by ancient Indian herbalists, like in the “Sushruta Samhita,” written in the 6th century BC and describing 700 medicinal plants, 64 preparations from mineral sources, and 57 preparations based on animal sources. In China, the “Shennong Ben Cao Jing” lists 365 medicinal plants and their uses – including Ephedra (the shrub that introduced the drug ephedrine to modern medicine), hemp, and chaulmoogra (one of the first effective treatments for leprosy). Succeeding generations augmented on the Shennong Bencao Jing, as in the Yaoxing Lun (Treatise on the Nature of Medicinal Herbs), a 7th-century Tang Dynasty treatise on herbal medicine.

Modern Views

Herbal Medicine is the Only Medicine. From the 16th to the 19th centuries, herbal medicine was the primary form of medication taken worldwide. Physicians were few and far between, but access to herbs and herbal medicines in the United States in particular was commonplace. Publications such as Dodoens’ New Herbal, Edinburgh New Dispensatory and Buchan’s Domestic Medicine sought to guide the home herbalist in finding and dispensing medications to their family. Aside from European knowledge on American plants, Native Americans shared some of their knowledge with colonists, but most of these records were not written and compiled until the 19th century. John Bartram was a botanist that studied the remedies that Native Americans would share and often included bits of knowledge of these plants in printed almanacs.

The formalization of pharmacology in the 19th century led to greater understanding of the specific actions drugs have on the body. At that time, Samuel Thompson was an uneducated but respected herbalist who influenced professional opinions so much that doctors and herbalists would refer to themselves as “Thompsonians,” distinguishing themselves from “regular” doctors of the time who used calomel and bloodletting.

Read more about herbal medicine and how it is practiced in modern-day America by reading this helpful blog!

Pharmaceuticals on The Shelf. In the light of Thompsonians, and the beginning rift between doctors and herbalists, physicians were quick to embrace pharmacology in 19th century as it helped to treat particularly pesky diseases. As a result, though, the use of herbal medicines became known as “alternative medicine,” implying it is somehow lesser. An overcorrection had occurred and while bloodletting and other medieval therapies were put by the wayside, herbal medicine mistakenly was lumped in with those, too.

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Holistic to the Rescue. As the 21st century dawns, the overcorrection of the modern, pharma-centric wave of medical practice seems to be subsiding. The “Opioid Crisis” as some have begun to call it has patients and care providers looking to treat illness in a safer, more traditional way, and herbal medicine is the obvious choice. Physicians are now providing a “holistic” approach to medical care – which may include herbal medication and diet recommendations along with pharmaceuticals.

 

Well Theory is your source for products, recipes, and lifestyle tips to help you live to your greatest potential. Our products blend modern, medical advances with powerful, natural ingredients. Choose Well Theory for resources on full body betterment and products to bolster your wellness so that you can live to your fullest potential.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation