How To Treat Heel Pain

How To Treat Heel Pain

Dr. Warner Talks Orthopedics:

heel pain & how to treat it

Heel pain can range from being a minor nuisance to nearly debilitating, changing our daily lives and activities. While this condition can be a common complaint among our patients, there are a number of causes of this discomfort, and treatment must be directed at the specific cause.

One of the most common causes of heel pain is plantar fasciitis, often occurring along with a heel ‘spur’. This bony prominence is located under the calcaneus, or heel bone. Heel spurs alone can be painless, but are often associated with a painful inflammation of the tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot, connecting the heel bone to the forefoot.

The spur itself is a calcium deposit, and can often be seen on x-ray. This deposit takes many months or years to appear, and is usually related to repetitive stress and strain on foot ligaments, particularly in athletes engaging in running and jumping, but obesity and the excessive weight can play a role. The plantar fascia is a thick connective tissue running from the calcaneus to the ball of the foot, and is very important in the mechanics of our foot movement and transmitting weight. If this tissue becomes inflamed, known as plantar fasciitis, it causes a painful heel/foot, often worse in the early morning upon waking (often a sharp, sticking pain), with some improvement throughout the day as it is stretched out, and returning after long periods of standing or walking. This pain is often described as a “stone bruise.”

If the pain is unresolved, the physician may consider injecting the area with an anti-inflammatory medication such as Ketolorac (Toradol) and Lidocaine, an anesthetic agent. Steroid injections, such as Cortisone, should be avoided due to risk of plantar fascial rupture and other side effects.commonly be found in people with no symptoms at all. Therefore, treatment is only needed when the spur is symptomatic and related to fasciitis, inflammation, and pain.

During your assessment, your doctor will examine the foot, and potentially request x-rays of the foot in order to delineate between other causes of heel pain, including Achilles tendinitis, stress fractures, a compressed nerve, tarsal tunnel syndrome, or retrocalcaneal bursitis. Your physician will then determine how best to treat the pain. Treatment can range from non-invasive attempts to reduce stress on the ligaments to injections or even to surgery.

 

Initial Treatment Options

your doctor may recommend

Rest – this helps alleviate the inflammation and pain.

Ice – helps to control pain.

NSAIDS/Anti-inflammatory medications (Advil/Aleve/Tylenol) – to control pain.

Exercises/stretching/physical therapy – relax the tissues around the heel bone and improve pain.

Shoe inserts/orthotic devices – help decrease pain with activity and improve foot mechanics.

Night splinting – keeps the heel stretched during sleep and less painful upon waking.

PRP Injections – A natural method of treatment using your own blood to promote healing.

If other methods have not been beneficial, the orthopedic surgeon may consider releasing this tight plantar fascia, in a plantar fascial release, and removing the spur, if present.

Click here to read about some of the most common causes of foot and ankle pain!

Occasionally heel pain may come from a hip rotation problem or even a spinal nerve compression. Read more about her unique methodology on our About page!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE
  • FDA-REGISTERED
  • PARABEN-FREE
  • 3RD PARTY TESTED
  • 100% NATURAL

Orthotics: A Simple Way to Cure Sore Feet

Orthotics: A Simple Way To Cure Sore Feet

Orthotics For Foot Pain

a simple + natural way to relieve pain

Orthotics is a branch of medical science that deals with the manufacturing and application of a device – commonly known as an orthotic – to correct the alignment of the neuromuscular and skeletal system. Orthotics design relies on knowledge of anatomy, physiology, biomechanics and engineering. Available for both upper and lower limbs, orthotics have multiple medical uses in addition to relieving sore feet, including:

  • assisting the movement of a joint in a particular direction
  • immobilizing the extremities to reduce weight bearing forces on the joints
  • aiding rehabilitation after a fracture
  • providing correct shape and function of body and reducing pain to optimize sporting performance

Orthotics provide support that appropriately distributes force while aligning the foot and ankle joint in the anatomically correct position, which aids in walking, running and standing. People of all ages who suffer from sore feet, heel pain, hammertoes, knee and back pain benefit from orthotics. They are particularly effective to help prevent diabetic patients from developing foot ulcers. In the past, plaster molds were used to create a custom fit for each patient, however now a computerized foot analysis is used that more accurately reflects the dynamic of each individual patient’s gait.

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Common Foot Orthotics

and how they help

  • Heel Insert: Includes a wedge inserted into the inner side of the soles to support flat feet and relieve sore feet
  • Ankle Foot Brace: Relieves the pain of rheumatoid arthritis in the heel and ankle
  • Heel Flare: Prevents ankle sprains
  • Heel Cushion: Absorbs and relieves stress on heel and ankle while running and walking
  • Toe separator: Used for corns and calluses between the toes
  • Soft Orthotic Cushion: Distributes pressure on the foot evenly
  • Wide Shoes or a Pad Under the Bones of the Forefoot: Relieves pain in the forefoot

The type of orthotic that your orthopedic doctor recommends will depend on your symptoms, the causes, and shape of your feet. When used correctly, orthotics help to realign the foot and ankle, correct deformities, relieve sore feet and improve the overall function of the foot and ankle. However, incorrect fit or use can change the mechanics of the patient’s gait and cause new problems rather than curing existing ones.

  • Limb Orthotics: Corrects lower limb deformities
  • Prefabricated Heel Insert: Made of silicon or rubber, these orthotics relieve heel pain or spurs
  • Full-Contact Cushion Orthotics (with deep cushion and rocker bottom soles): Help diabetic patients prevent foot ulcers by reducing pressure on the foot
  • Shoes with a Wide Toe Box: Used for patients who suffer from hammer toes and bunions
  • Sport Orthotics: For runners and athletes, these full-length, soft devices help reduce stress and prevent feet from turning inward.

Patients should always consult an orthopedic physician before buying or using an orthotic device. Click here to read about more ways you can address heel pain naturally – at home.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE
  • FDA-REGISTERED
  • PARABEN-FREE
  • 3RD PARTY TESTED
  • 100% NATURAL

5 Ways to Treat Heel Pain Yourself

5 Ways To Treat Heel Pain Yourself

5 Ways To Treat Heel Pain Yourself

safely, naturally and at home

Heel pain is very common. This pain is disabling and is from heel spurs, inflamed tissues or degenerating tissues in the foot. The pain is felt on the bottom of the heel, mostly on the inside half of the bottom of the heel. The pain occurs when standing or walking or running. This pain is very intense with the first step in the morning or after sitting at a desk or driving for a long time period.

There are a number of safe and proven ways you can treat this pain without needing to see a doctor or pay a copay. Here are 5 ways to self-treat:

1. Stretch Your Leg Muscles

Stretching the calves is very important for treating heel pain. This is an indirect stretch for the plantar fascia. The plantar fascia is the source of heel pain. This fascia begins on the bottom of the heel bone. The calf muscles insert on the back of the heel bone. By stretching the calf muscle, you indirectly treat the pain that starts on the bottom of the heel.

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2. Stretch the Tissue on the Bottom of the Foot

Stretch the tissue on the bottom of the foot. Tissue-specific stretching really works. Studies have shown that this is as effective as many other prescribed treatments. Tissue-specific stretching works best if it is done with calf stretching. The combination of a direct and indirect stretch optimizes pain relief.

 

3. Massage Your Foot with a Tennis Ball

Tennis balls are inexpensive and if you leave near a court, probably free. If you roll the bottom of your foot on a tennis ball, that massages the tissues and muscles on the sole. By doing this, you are using a therapy technique and treating your own pain. This is particularly effective to reduce the amount of pain felt with the first step in the morning. Just be sure to keep the tennis ball off the floor when you aren’t massaging your plantar fascia; this is a safety tip!

 

4. Massage Your Foot with a Frozen Water Bottle

Freeze a bottle of water and use that to massage the foot. By placing an individual bottle of water in the freezer, you can make your own ice therapy device. Granted, it is not as sophisticated as some that are prescribed, but it can be effective. Icing is a known technique in orthopedic and sports medicine. Icing a painful body part can reduce pain and reduce swelling. This should be done on a towel to reduce the risk of a wet floor when you are done.

 

5. Utilize a Massage Device

Use a device like “The Heeler” to ice and provide a deeper massage to the muscles and fascia on the bottom of the foot and the heel. “The Heeler” provides ice therapy and deeper stretching of the tissues at the same time.

Bonus Tip: Start A Multivitamin Regimen

act now, get steady results

Dr. Warner, orthopedic surgeon and founder of Well Theory, has often found that her patients are lacking essential vitamins and minerals in their diets. Sometimes, this can cause joint inflammation and discomfort. Read more about how to choose the right multivitamin for your condition today!

Dr. Warner designed her Bone & Joint Multi to:

  • Help fill the nutritional gaps in your diet 
  • Support a healthy response to inflammation 
  • Promote post-surgical recovery 
  • Pre-surgical optimization 
  • Promote overall musculoskeletal health for bone, joints, tendons, muscles, and ligaments

Discover more ways to treat heel pain by reading this helpful blog!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE
  • FDA-REGISTERED
  • PARABEN-FREE
  • 3RD PARTY TESTED
  • 100% NATURAL

Ankle Arthritis Treatment Options

Ankle Arthritis Treatment Options

Ankle Realignment Osteotomy

an alternative to ankle fusion surgery

Ankle arthritis is common and as debilitating as knee arthritis or hip arthritis. Ankle arthritis, unlike knee or hip arthritis, is usually post-traumatic. While almost all arthritis of the knee and hip is age-related and genetic in nature, up to 80% of ankle arthritis is post-traumatic. Usually, the patient had a fracture or very significant ligamentous injuries at some point. It may take 20 to 30 years for such arthritis to become problematic in the ankle.

Ankle arthritis does not automatically mean that a fusion is necessary as the treatment. Although for many years fusion surgery was the so-called ‘gold standard’ for the treatment of painful arthritis, this is no longer true. There are a variety of treatment options that should be discussed at your clinic visit. However, unless your surgeon is current and is performing cutting-edge surgeries, he or she may not think outside of fusion for the treatment of ankle arthritis.

If a patient presents with arthritis and a deformity whereby the ankle turns either in or out too much, a realignment osteotomy is a good option. This surgery is very technical and requires good technique, proper patient selection, and thorough preoperative planning. If your surgeon is able and willing to do this type of surgery, it is a great way to keep your own ankle joint and reduce pain yet increase function. 

Eventually, as one ages a fusion may be necessary; however, a well-done realignment osteotomy is often converted to a total ankle replacement. A replacement can treat end-stage arthritis with a motion preserving implant.

The basic principle of a realignment osteotomy:

changing contact pressures of the ankle joint.

An ankle joint that is misaligned by even 2mm (2 millimeters) can have increased contact pressures of up to 42% overall. More contact pressure eventually leads to cartilage damage and possibly pain. Unless the ankle is as close to anatomically aligned as possible, the arthritis will progress and the pain will remain. By changing the overall shape of the ankle, pressure is redistributed and the cartilage is preserved. Patients that undergo this surgery have pain relief and improved function. This is so even when up to 50% of the joint surface is arthritic prior to surgery.

How do you know if your ankle would benefit from a realignment osteotomy?

The first thing you must do is find a surgeon that performs these surgeries, understands them and is willing to do them. Many surgeons still believe that fusions are the only answer to arthritis. If your surgeon tells you that fusion is the only option and that nothing else will ever work, simply locate a surgeon that is performing these advanced joint-preserving procedures. If you have arthritis in the ankle with a deformity, you could benefit from this procedure. The usual deformities are a ‘valgus’ or ‘varus’ ankle; these are ankles that tilt too much to either side. 

The individuals that typically do not do well with this procedure have absolutely no cartilage left, infection, neuropathic bone changes (different from sensory neuropathy) or have a totally un-fixable instability of the ligaments. Otherwise, you could be a candidate for this joint-sparing procedure.

Questions Your Physician Should Ask

stay informed throughout your treatment plan

  • Do you have arthritis of the ankle?
  • Is your ankle arthritis due to a previous fracture?
  • Is your ankle arthritis due to infection or neuropathy?
  • Is your ankle arthritis from a severe ankle sprain or a series of minor ankle sprains?
  • How old are you?
  • What is your height and weight?
  • Do you have an osteochondral defect of the talar dome? (an OCD?)
  • Have you been told that you have a cartilage fracture or dead bone?
  • Have you been told that your only option is a fusion surgery?
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For natural pain relief designed by an orthopedic surgeon, browse through our full line of gentle, yet effective pain-relieving products. We included CBD in our formulations to naturally engage the body’s inflammatory response, reducing discomfort, swelling, and pain in a steady, holistic way. You can also click here to read about the best natural herbs for arthritis relief – and start your journey to natural relief from arthritic pain.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE
  • FDA-REGISTERED
  • PARABEN-FREE
  • 3RD PARTY TESTED
  • 100% NATURAL

Common Causes of Foot and Ankle Pain

Common Causes Of Foot And Ankle Pain

Common Causes Of Foot & Ankle Pain

and symptoms you should look for

We take our feet for granted most of the time. They get us out of bed in the morning, take us on a jog around the neighborhood, and keep us moving all day long. We squeeze them into high heels, pound them on miles of pavement, and ignore their minor aches. Only when foot and ankle pain suddenly stops us in our tracks, literally, do we put our feet up and take notice.

Have you ever seen a reflexology chart of the foot? Reflexologists believe that each part of the foot is connected to another part of the human body. Problems in the body may be felt in the foot and treatment of the foot may help pain in the body according to this theory.

We know that the entire human body is interconnected, and that is certainly true with our feet as well. The feet act as the foundation for all motion and function. Pain in one area may be caused by something going on in a completely separate part of the body.

In her clinical practice, orthopedic surgeon and founder of Well Theory, Dr. Meredith Warner, investigates foot and ankle pain with a full body exam to understand where the foot pain is coming from, and how it is affecting the whole body. Often, someone that presents with ankle pain will be found to have a dysfunctional hip that is causing them to walk and run poorly; this causes the ankle pain. If the leg and hip are ignored, this will not be discovered and the foot will remain painful.

Based on the location of pain, a diagnosis is usually straightforward, and may be corroborated using a simple x-ray or blood test. Dr. Warner treats all of the following common foot and ankle conditions on a daily basis:

Toe Pain

and the conditions that cause it

Corns– Caused by continuous pressure on the sole of the foot, corns are a painful thickening of the skin that often reoccurs. These are similar in nature to the calluses found on the fingertips of a guitarist. Conventional treatment includes corn caps and cryosurgery, wearing shoes with insoles and a good fit. However, it is important that your doctor recognize and treat the source of the pressure as well, or the callus will simply return.

Gout– Gout is a form of arthritis that deposits uric acid crystals in joint tissues. These crystals are small, sharp spikes of minerals that attack the joint surface. Gout symptoms occur rapidly and frequently start with severe pain in the dead of the night. Often a gout attack will happen after a heavy meal, particularly one with red meat. Treatment includes non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, colchicine, aspirin, and allopurinol therapy to keep the uric acid levels under check and prevent recurrence. Occasionally, injections or surgery is necessary. Topical pain creams are quite effective for this problem. A natural remedy with good effectiveness are tart cherries.

Hammer toes– Chronic use of small, ill-fitted or high-heeled shoes can make toes hurt. The shoes may cause the toes to take on a peculiar bent shape that looks like small hammers. Usually, hammer toes are caused by genetics and shoes simply make them symptomatic. Treatment options include avoiding shoes that make the hammer toes hurt; a cobbler may stretch the upper of the shoe and give more room for the toes; stretching and strengthening exercises for the toes; painkillers, both oral and topical; insoles; and in extreme cases orthopedic surgery might be required. 

Bunions– Abnormal bony prominences at the joint of the great toe are called bunions. This condition may be very painful and should to be remedied before it become a permanent deformity. Bunions are a genetic condition and are typically progressive; that is, they will increase or become worse over time. This worsening occurs regardless of shoe wear. Causes and treatment are the same as for hammer toe. Treatment starts conservatively, but often surgery is required. 

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Arthritis– The most common reason for joint pain anywhere in the body, arthritis is joint inflammation that often occurs in adults older than 50. Foot pain may often be caused by arthritis; treatment is similar as for arthritis in the knee or hip. Painkillers, exercises, weight reduction, calcium, vitamin D can help to manage chronic arthritis. Physical therapy is a very effective treatment for arthritis. 

Trauma– Any trauma to a joint in the foot can cause a fracture or a ligament tear or sprain. A fracture is a broken bone and treatment changes based on which bone is broken, how it is broken and also on patient characteristics. Fractures, or broken bones, should be evaluated by an orthopedic surgeon. Sprains or ligament tears may occur with trauma as well; sometimes soft tissue heals faster than broken bones. Treatment varies but may occasionally require no weight bearing on the affected joint for at least two weeks and some type of compression wrap along with ice, elevation and physical therapy.

Heel Pain

and the conditions that cause it

Plantar fasciitis– Plantar fasciitis is the degeneration of the ligaments and tendons below the heel can cause early morning foot pain. Usually this pain is due to damage to the plantar fascia. The plantar fascia is one of the most important stabilizers of the arch in the foot, and is also important in the function of the foot and in allowing for motion. This condition is extremely painful and can last up to 2 years. Treatment includes anti-inflammatory drugs, insoles, topical ointments, stretching exercises, rest and ice packs. Treatment may also include surgery, injections, physical therapy and/or acupuncture.

Calcaneal spur– A bony ridge protruding from the heel bone (i.e. calcaneus) can cause a lot of heel trouble. It arises from the calcaneus (heel bone) near the plantar fascia and can be confirmed by a x-ray. Treatment options include pain-killers, topical ointments and orthopedic surgery. Treatment for heel spurs is often the same as treatment for plantar fasciitis. Surgery should be a last resort for this problem.

Fallen Arch– A fallen arch causes compression of the structures that are meant to be preserved by the arch, such as the nerves, blood vessels, ligaments, tendons and muscles. Wedges and insoles are the main line of treatment, however surgery is often needed for permanent resolution.

Damage to tendons- …such as the posterior tibial tendon, may cause arch pain as well. If there is damage to this tendon, the arch becomes unstable. The posterior tibial tendon holds the highest point of the arch (apex) and stabilizes it. This tendon also initiates the push-off portion of the gait cycle. Tears or stretching injury to this tendon cause pain. However, damage to this tendon also cause significant instability and collapse of the arch.

Foot and ankle pain can be caused all of the above conditions, as well as a wide range of others that include nerve damage due to chronic diabetes, vitamin B-12 deficiency, or folic acid deficiency. An accurate diagnosis and treatment plan requires the attention of an orthopedic specialist.

If your foot pain is caused by a nutritional deficiency, including a multivitamin in your daily wellness routine is a great way to naturally combat stubborn pain. Click here to read more about how to choose the right multivitamin for your condition!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE
  • FDA-REGISTERED
  • PARABEN-FREE
  • 3RD PARTY TESTED
  • 100% NATURAL

Treat Achilles Tendinitis Naturally

Treat Achilles Tendinitis Naturally

How To Tell If You Have Achilles Tendinitis

and how to treat it

Achilles tendinitis is a condition that causes pain along the back of the leg, concentrated near the heel. The Achilles tendon has its point of attachment at the posterior aspect of the heel. 

As the largest tendon in the body, the Achilles tendon connects the posterior calf muscle to the heel bone – which makes it integral to balance and posture. The tendon transmits force/power from the hips and legs to the foot. Due to how often it is used the tendon is prone to tendinitis and/or tendinosis.

Tendinitis is the inflammation of a tendon and a natural response to injury or disease. There are two types of Achilles tendinitis that are defined by which part of the tendon is inflamed. Tendinosis refers to a condition that is more degenerative in nature than inflammatory.

 

Noninsertional Achilles Tendinitis: In this form of tendinitis the fibers in the middle portion of the Achilles tendon have begun to degenerate, thicken and swell. This typically affects young active people, but anyone may have this problem. The area above the bony insertion becomes very thick and painful. Often a lump forms on the tendon and can be very painful.

Insertional Achilles Tendinitis: This form of tendinitis affects the upper portion of the heel where the tendon attaches to the foot. In many cases bone spurs form within the tendon itself with this type of tendinitis. Insertional Achilles Tendinitis can affect most people at any time, even if they aren’t active. It may be genetic or age-related. This condition often occurs in conjunction with a “pump bump,” which is a bone deformity on the upper portion of the back of the heel bone.

What Causes Tendinitis?

Achilles Tendinitis typically occurs from repetitive stress to the tendon. Whenever we overload our body’s ability to heal itself from normal daily trauma or increase the intensity of exercise to soon we’re more likely to develop tendinitis. Other influences can lead to tendinitis as well:

  • Rapid increases to the intensity or frequency of activity
  • Having tight calf muscles and implementing a rigorous workout program
  • Bone spurs, which can rub against the tendon
  • Change in foot wear
  • Medical conditions or autoimmue disorders
  • Immobilization and deconditioning

Symptoms include pain and stiffness along the Achilles tendon in the morning that increases during activity. Many patients report that their Achilles tendon thickens and swells throughout the day. Many people actually feel better as the tendon warms up and they use it. Once the tendon is inactive for an extended period of time, the pain may return.

Your Options For Treatment

and when to consider surgery

Nonsurgical treatment will often help sufferers with pain relief. The pain may continue for 3 to 6 months before treatment methods can be effective. Rest can be the first step in reducing pain. 

Low-impact activities can make the pain less intense and allow athletes to maintain their exercise programs. Sometimes all that is required to relieve pain and stress to the tendon is a 1-2 centimeter heel lift in the shoe, which takes enough force off the tendon insertion to reduce pain. Open back shoes or structural flip-flops help.

A physician or trainer should guide you as you begin to increase movement of the Achilles through walking or other gentle exercises.

Placing ice on the most painful area of the tendon for 20 minutes at a time can be helpful in easing pain. Ibuprofen, Naproxen and other drugs can also reduce pain and swelling. There are also a number of exercises and stretches that can ease pain. 

The most common treatment for this condition, and often one of the most effective methods of treatment, is physical therapy. There are very specialized treatment protocols for this common condition that work very well. This treatment will vary from dry needling and massage to eccentric loading routines (otherwise known as Alfredson’s protocol).

Patients should only consider surgery if pain persists after an adequate course of nonsurgical treatment methods. The type of surgery a doctor will recommend depends on where the tendinitis is concentrated and how bad the damage is. Also, the post-operative recovery and therapy protocol varies among surgeons – so it is important to seek out second opinions if it does come to that point.

If you have heel pain and aren’t sure if it’s necessarily Achilles Tendinitis, click here to read our blog on how to naturally treat other forms of heel pain!

For natural relief without harsh side effects, reach for our line of holistic products. Designed by an orthopedic surgeon, Well Theory uses the best remedies from herbal medicine and traditional therapeutic methods to provide steady pain relief and reduced inflammation throughout the body.

For more information about Achilles Tendinitis visit the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE
  • FDA-REGISTERED
  • PARABEN-FREE
  • 3RD PARTY TESTED
  • 100% NATURAL

Treating A Sprained Ankle

Treating a Sprained Ankle

What To Do

for a sprained ankle

An ankle is sprained when the ligaments that work to support the ankle are stretched outside of their range and a tear occurs. Ankle sprains are a very common injury that can range from mild to severe depending on the stress placed on the ligaments. Most sprains can be healed with at-home remedies, like rest or applying ice. However, if your ankle is extremely swollen and painful to walk on you should see your doctor.

You can also read this blog to discover common causes of foot and ankle pain – and discover what kind of specific condition you may be suffering from.

Anatomy

The ligaments in the ankles keep the bones in the proper position and work to stabilize the joint. Most sprains occur in the lateral ligaments on the outside of the ankle. Some sprains are tiny tears in the fiber, while others are complete tears through the tissue.

If there is a complete tear the ankle can become increasingly unstable over time.

Causes

The foot can be twisted in a motion that sprains the ankle in a number of ways during many different activities. Walking or exercising on an uneven surface can lead to instability. Participating in sports that require the player to roll or twist their foot can be dangerous as well. During some activities someone else may step on your foot as you move, which can lead to you twisting or rolling your foot to the side.

Symptoms

A sprained ankle can be incredibly painful. Symptoms include swelling, bruising and tenderness to touch. When there has been a complete tearing of the ligament or dislocation of the ankle joint one may suffer from instability. If there is a severe tear you may hear or feel a pop when the sprain occurs. Sprain symptoms are very similar to those of a broken bone.

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