The Science Behind How You Heal

The Science Behind How You Heal

How you heal

an orthopedic surgeon's perspective

Hi, Dr. Meredith Warner here –

As an orthopedic surgeon, I not only specialize in surgical procedures – but also have to be an expert in the process of healing. Surgery is simply a means to the end – and the goal of each procedure is healing and the promotion of better form and function. I’d like to share a little bit of what I know about the physical process of healing with you today:

There are four main phases of healing that are universal and generally follow the same pattern and timing no matter what. If there is variation, that is when there are problems. Diabetics, for example, have differences in timing between the four phases of healing, which makes their wounds heal slower or become chronic.

Connective tissue is the stuff that puts a human together and makes the body “stick” together – not just tendons and ligaments. Connective tissue can be bone, ligament, nerves, muscles, tendons and the matrix (surrounding gel/fluid) that holds the cells in place. Its universality throughout the structures of the body serves as a reminder for the interconnectedness of the healing cycle.

When a connective tissue is injured, the collagen must be reformed and the structure of the material (skin, tendon, ligament, etc.) must be re-formed. The human body uses a four-step process that reliably achieves these goals if the environment is right.

The four phases of healing are hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation and remodeling.

Stage One:

Hemostasis

Just after an injury, the body is in a default mode to protect and survive. If, for example, an injury results in bleeding, the body stops the bleeding in an effort to preserve the tissue and save energy for possible fight or flight. The body does this primarily through the process of clotting.

A clot is a clump of platelets and inflammatory cells that are the first to arrive at the site of injury. They are called to the area by a complicated system of signals released into the bloodstream as soon as an injury occurs. At the scene of the wound, be it a cut, laceration, contusion, burn, chemical exposure, tear or anything, the platelets bind the exposed collagen of that tissue within the extracellular matrix. Once bound, the platelets begin to work.

Platelets are magical fragments of cells in the blood stream with awesome healing capacity. These begin to immediately secrete sphingosine-1-phosphate, thrombospondin, fibronectin, von Willebrand factor.

These then stimulate even more platelet action, promoting a release of clotting factors, which stop the bleeding – by causing a matrix of fibrin to develop that acts as a plug. This stable clot/plug then acts as a bed for substances and cells flowing into the wound, because the platelets in a clot also secrete growth factors that are integral to the next steps in healing.

Once these are released by platelets into the wound environment, other cells like neutrophils and macrophages enter the zone. PDGF recruits cells that form fibrin (fibroblasts) and then collagen begins to be deposited – beginning the tissue repair process.

Also read: Why You Should Consider a Multivitamin Before Surgery.

Stage Two:

Inflammation

The hemostasis phase starts immediately after an injury and overlaps with the inflammatory phase of healing. The inflammatory phase should only last a few days. If it persists, then chronic inflammation results and then chronic non-healing or poorly healing tissue is the outcome. For now, we will focus on a normal inflammatory phase of healing.

At the core of the healing process – and any process that occurs in the body – is something called the Endocannabinoid System, or ECS. The ECS governs each “task” your body undergoes – from triggering healing, the sensation of hunger, the sensation of pain, and especially the onset of inflammation.

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An overeager inflammatory response is often the root cause of many conditions. While it has its place in the context of healing, sometimes the ECS can be overloaded and promotes inflammation for longer than it is necessary, causing problems. Here is how inflammation is supposed to work, when the ECS is promoting a proper inflammatory response:


There is a group of signalling molecules in the bloodstream known as the ‘complement’ system. The complement system is activated at the time of the inflammatory phase. The system brings mediators that control the ‘leakiness’ of the surrounding blood vessels and also brings chemotactic factors. These in turn attract white blood cells (leukocytes) withing 24-48 hours after the injury.

The ECS System

and how it impacts inflammation

There is a group of signalling molecules in the bloodstream known as the ‘complement’ system. The complement system is activated at the time of the inflammatory phase. The system brings mediators that control the ‘leakiness’ of the surrounding blood vessels and also brings chemotactic factors. These in turn attract white blood cells (leukocytes) withing 24-48 hours after the injury.

Mast cells ( a type of leukocyte) appear as well and release granules filled with histamine. This is what causes what we think of clinically as inflammation. Mast cells and histamines are directly responsible for the redness, warmth, heat and pain of inflammation. Basically, the “leakiness” of the blood vessels in the region is increased by histamines and that allows for more healing and building cells to reach the zone of injury.

One of these cells is the neutrophil. Neutrophils remove bad things from the wound; they act to remove pathogens, damaged matrix, dead cells and ferign material. Neutrophils do this by phagocytosis; this is literally the ‘eating’ of the bad stuff. These are early and aggressive cells that begin the process of healing.

Next, monocytes and lymphocytes enter. These become macrophages. Macrophages are the workhorses of the demolition process, because they remove remaining dead and damaged tissues. The macrophages are more selective and powerful than the neutrophils and they do a more ordered and detailed “clean-up” of the damaged tissues.

Macrophages are also important because these cells also produce more healing factors. All of these growth factors and cytokines from macrophages act to cause the fibroblasts (fiber forming cells) to grow along with smooth muscle and endothelial cells. Endothelial cells are lining cells for vessels and skin.

Once the macrophages have finished cleaning up the injury site and started the healing and rebuilding process by providing the building blocks, they actually then remove the neutrophils – the cells that clean up debris and are one of the first cells that reach the injury. As these cells are removed, the proliferation phase begins.

Stage Three:

Proliferation

The proliferation phase is the actual construction phase of the tissue. Here is where the connective tissue is made whole again.

The fibrin and fibrin matrix that was produced at the inflammatory phase is merely a scaffold for the actual tissue. It is ‘granulation’ tissue and must be converted to the actual tissue needed; this may be smooth skin, strong tendons and ligaments, muscle or bone. The fibrin is replaced by collagen. This process usually starts on day 2 or 3 after the injury or surgery.

Proliferation involves angiogenesis (forming of new blood vessels), tissue granulation, re-epithelialization (formation of skin) and wound contraction (making a wound small).

The formation of new blood vessels is important because without blood nothing can heal. Blood brings oxygen and nutrition. Blood also allows for the efficient removal of waste. Different growth factors are released that signal for this process to happen.

The growth factors that are released also stimulate fibroblasts, which start the process of skin production. Skin building cells called keratinocytes flow to the injury site through the bloodstream and enter from the edges of the wound. Fibroblasts come from bone marrow when they respond to the chemical signals released during the inflammatory phase. These produce a matrix that allows for tissue to build. The matrix is made of proteins like collagen, fibronectin and hyaluronan. The fibroblasts are stimulated to produce by the PDGF and EGF that the macrophages make.

Some fibroblasts will turn into ‘myofibroblasts’. These have a muscular component and will literally pull the edges of the wound together to make it smaller as it heals.

Stage Four:

Remodeling

Wound remodeling is the last phase of healing. It usually starts at week 2 or 3 and can last up to a year in some cases. In this phase the tissue matures and becomes its true self. 

Weaker collagen is replaced by stronger collagen. Disorganized tissue becomes organized. The organization process is regulated by the fibroblasts that secrete an enzyme that degrades the collagen matrix of the wound bed and allows for the realignment of that collagen into organized networks. That organization is modified by stress, load, pressure, gravity and other mechanical and chemical forces. 

The key to good wound repair is the remodeling and re-organization of the extracellular matrix of the damaged tissue – how well it was constructed during the earlier phases of healing. This is why it is so important to make sure that you allow your body plenty of rest during this time, only undergoing physical therapy if advised to do so by your physician. Good nutrition is also key to making sure your body advances through the four phases of healing properly.

 

Prevent Chronic Inflammation

for proper healing

If the injury or condition goes without proper treatment, or if you have some underlying condition that makes you more prone to inflammation, you can experience chronic inflammation – which does more harm than good. chronic inflammation results and then chronic non-healing or poorly healing tissue is the outcome.

This is why ensuring you have a foundation of good nutrition and overall wellness is essential for your recovery process – from surgery or any other procedure. I recommend starting a supplement regimen to all my patients before their treatments, especially those that require surgery. Nutrition provides the building blocks for all functions of the body – and is especially important for recovery after an injury or surgery.

I developed my multivitamin with all the essential nutrients we commonly miss out on in our diets – and included Full Spectrum CBD powder in my formulation. CBD has been making waves in the medical and scientific communities for its powerful anti-inflammatory properties, making it a game changer for achieving full-body wellness.

 
ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE
  • FDA-REGISTERED
  • PARABEN-FREE
  • 3RD PARTY TESTED
  • 100% NATURAL

Things to do if You’re Considering Surgery

Things to do if You're Considering Surgery

Before You Undergo surgery

follow these quick tips

If you’re considering surgery, it’s likely because you’ve been experiencing near-constant symptoms and have exhausted all other options available to you. Even so, there are still some things that you should take into account before considering surgery. It’s important that you remain as informed as possible to remain an equal participant in your treatment plan. Fully understanding any risks of the procedure you may undertake will help you manage your expectations better, heal faster, and recover more fully.

Questions You Should Ask

during your pre-surgery consultation

Seek a second opinion. Your surgeon will not be offended and will likely encourage you to seek the guidance of outside medical opinions. Sometimes, all it takes to find a different option to surgery is a fresh set of eyes on your medical history. And if the surgeon you see for a second opinion comes to the same conclusion as the first, you can be confident that surgery is your best option.

How much will the surgery be, and is it covered by insurance? You will likely have to call your insurance company and speak to the front office staff at your surgeon’s office. Ask about things like physician’s fees, hospital services, physical therapy (if applicable) and prescriptions needed to prepare for your procedure and help you recover afterwards. This will also help you better understand the risks of your procedure, and how much the surgery will impact your life afterwards.

Everyone’s insurance plans are different; pricing of surgery changes based on contracted rates, co-insurance, deductibles, co-pays and out-of-pocket maximums and HSA allowed expenses. In addition, some necessary services (such as an assistant in surgery) are not covered by insurance companies. You should have a good picture of all of these variables before committing to a surgery.

What will happen if you don’t get surgery? Is the surgery something that needs to happen immediately? How will your symptoms or condition change if you wait a month, six months, or even a year to have your procedure?

What alternatives have not been exhausted? You can bring this up in your “second opinion” appointment as well.  There are a massive amount of non-surgical treatments out there; what you are actually offered by a surgeon depends upon the surgeon’s training, education and beliefs.

Most surgeons trained in allopathic (MD) medical schools are trained not to believe in complementary or alternative medicine.  At Warner Orthopedics and Wellness we do believe in CAM and often integrate it into our plans with or without surgical intervention.  

 

Things To Know About

your post-surgery recovery

What will recovery be like? This includes how long you will be expected to remain in the hospital (if at all), how your surgery will limit your range of movement or daily activities, etc. You will need to know all of your restrictions ahead of time. It would also be good to find out your surgeon’s beliefs about pain medications. The fewer the better and this is important; the CDC has released data proving that addiction can occur in as quickly as 6 days of opioid use.

Consider taking a multivitamin before surgery to optimize and shorten your recovery!

What are the benefits of the surgery, and how long will they last? Depending on your condition and the procedure itself, it is likely that while surgery may reduce your symptoms, it may not relieve them entirely. It’s important to make sure you have reasonable expectations. If the surgery doesn’t relieve your symptoms as much as you’d hoped, trying alternative procedures under the guidance of your physician may be equally as beneficial. Functional improvements are equally as important as pain relief; don’t forget to ask about how your function could improve.

How do I prepare for the surgery, both physically and mentally? If you and your physician have decided that surgery is your best option, you can still make preparations at home. Starting a multivitamin regimen with your physician’s approval, exercising and stretching to make post-surgery physical therapy a little easier, and addressing any anxiety you may be experiencing about the procedure itself are great ways to prepare.

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(Often a pre-operative psychological evaluation to improve post-operative performance is helpful; remember, most professional athletes have sports psychologists on speed dial and there is no reason we should be different.) You should also take this time to ask close friends and family to help you with daily tasks after surgery, like cooking, cleaning, or taking you to follow-up doctor’s and physical therapy appointments.

Dr. Warner, orthopedic surgeon and founder of Well Theory, has always taken a patient-led approach in her clinical practice – exhausting all alternative treatments before recommending surgery. She decided to develop Well Theory to give you access to surgeon-approved advice and natural pain-fighting + inflammation-reducing products that you can incorporate into your daily wellness routine.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE
  • FDA-REGISTERED
  • PARABEN-FREE
  • 3RD PARTY TESTED
  • 100% NATURAL

Eucalyptus: A Natural Pain Reliever

Eucalyptus: A Natural Pain Reliever

Eucalyptus For Pain

why it works & how to use it

Dr. Warner here –

Why am I passionate about using eucalyptus as a powerful pain reliever?

The reason is simple – I love Koalas!  

Just kidding. Although Koala bears do eat a lot of eucalyptus, that is not why I view this wonderful plant as a successful tool in the treatment and healing of  part of connective tissue disorders. 

Let’s look at eucalyptus and why it can be a staple in natural pain relief.

Eucalpytus In the Wild

 

Just about ¾ of the vegetation of Australia is a species of eucalyptus. There are over 650 types, actually, and almost all of these are exclusive to Australia. The Aborigines have been known to eat the roots or seeds of some of these species. Another great use of the roots is as a water source during droughts.  

For me however, it is the volatile oils of the leaves that really makes sense for medicinal and wellness purposes. Applied directly to the skin, eucalyptus oil has been used for thousands of years to heal wounds and cure fungal infections. Breathing the vapors through aromatherapy helps to clear sinuses when a head cold has taken over. 

Sadly, fires involving eucalyptus forests are almost impossible to extinguish. This is due to the chemical nature of the fire; the plant produces so much oil that it becomes almost a giant grease fire. The oils are actually volatile essential oils and as such become gas which is flammable in large amounts. Because Eucalyptus is also invasive, it will choke out other less hazardous plants.  

Since the commercial distillation of the leaves became common practice, much research has been completed on this wonderful plant’s chemical properties. Click here to read more about herbal medicine safety concerns – and what you should consider before starting a natural therapy regimen.

Turns out that eucalyptus indeed has strong anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties. When properly distilled and rubbed onto an area of pain, the eucalyptus will provide relief from pain and tension. This is perfect for headaches, muscle aches, and tendon, ligament, and skin problems. 

Eucalyptus In Medicine

how it was discovered

In 1856 the first eucalyptus plants made it to the USA and were planted in California. There is an abundance of eucalyptus in South America now as well. 

In 1870, F.S. Cloez identified the main medicinal component of this plant, thus discovering eucalyptol. About a decade later, surgeons like me (but all men!) began to employ eucalyptol as an antiseptic. That denotes the absolute power of this herbal remedy to eliminate bacteria and fungus from the skin. 

The commercialization of this herbal remedy started with the British Empire, of course. The British have a very strong tradition of using herbal medicine and easily incorporated different plants and methods from around the world into their formulas. 

Eucalyptol is simply another medicinal product produced in mass quantities to relieve common human ailments. In this case, Halls developed Mentho-Lyptus cough drops. Now that name makes sense, right? The combination of menthol (derived of mint) and eucalyptol (derived of eucalyptus) made a simple and effective treatment of the common cold.

Uses For Eucalyptus

and how eucalyptus oil is extracted

The leaves of this plant form a film; this film is white and will rub off the leaf when it is touched. Leaves can be up to a foot long. The essential oils developed in the leaves act as a natural defense mechanism for the plant itself. The oils protect plants from insects and bacteria. Leaves should be harvested before flowering. Today, there are large farms with these trees that are pruned regularly for mass oil production. 

The volatile oil of the type cineole, called eucalyptol, is the predominant method of healing for this plant. This acts as an expectorant for us in Western Medicine. 

In countries that easily blend herbal and western medicine (like we do in my clinic), it is used for many reasons. In Germany, it is actually an approved therapy for bronchitis. The volatile component of the plant will change the nature of human lung secretions and make them easier to remove. Cilia, or small hairs, line the lung and air passages and will actually physically move the mucus from the deep lung to an area that can allow coughing evacuation. 

For asthmatics, eucalyptus is very helpful too. In one study, a group of asthmatics using eucalyptol were able to reduce their dosages of steroids; this was found in a study that compared that group to a placebo (fake medicine) group. 

Eucalyptus is an awesome antiseptic. It combats the bacteria and viruses that cause upper respiratory infections.   

 

Today we do not recommend the ingestion of eucalyptus. Although ancient peoples have and still do eat some of the parts of the plant, for us the ingestions can be harmful. There have been reports of nausea and vomiting, low blood pressure, increased heart rate and even breathing problems if the herb is taken orally.

This begs the question of how do Koala bears stand it? 

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I believe in the power of plant-based remedies and natural methods of healing, and I decided to blend this with the effectiveness of traditional western medicine in my Well Theory products.

Use Well Theory as your source for more methods of relieving pain for connective tissue disorders today.

Signing off,

Meredith Warner, MD

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE
  • FDA-REGISTERED
  • PARABEN-FREE
  • 3RD PARTY TESTED
  • 100% NATURAL

Natural + Effective Whiplash Therapy

Natural + Effective Whiplash Therapy

What Is Whiplash?

how to tell if you have it + how to treat it

Whiplash is a common term that we often hear referred to in movies by characters wearing a neck brace in their attorney’s office. However, it is a real injury that can cause serious pain and complications and requires attentive treatment.

The term “whiplash” is actually a non-medical colloquialism that refers to the possible occurrence of a “cervical acceleration-deceleration” (CAD) – a sudden extension of the neck that is purported to cause a wide range of injuries that are typically referred to as “whiplash associated disorders” (WAD). However, this is actually a vague term that is attached to complaints of neck pain without a true anatomic basis.

These extreme motions – when your head suddenly moves backward then forward, similar to someone cracking a whip – push your neck muscles and ligaments beyond their normal range of motion. 

The human body is built to withstand such motions. Generally, muscles “brace” when this happens and the pain is actually muscle soreness.

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The term “whiplash” is most often associated with motor vehicle accidents, but whiplash can be sustained in many other ways, including:

 

  • Physical abuse (such as Shaken Baby Syndrome)
  • Contact sports
  • Bungee jumping
  • Falls

One of the most common nonfatal car crash complaints, whiplash, has been reported to occur at speeds of fifteen miles per hour or less. It is estimated that more than one million whiplash injuries are claimed to occur each year due to car crashes.

How To Tell If You Have Whiplash

look for these symptoms

Symptoms can appear directly after the injury, but often are not felt until days afterwards. The most common areas of the spine affected by whiplash are the neck and middle of the spine. Late pain is usually muscle soreness. This should be reassuring in that soft tissue injuries, like muscular strains, heal fairly quickly.

Many whiplash associated symptoms develop within 24 hours of the injury and may include:

  • Neck pain and stiffness
  • Headaches, most commonly at the base of the skull
  • Dizziness
  • Blurred vision
  • Fatigue
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Memory problems
  • Ringing in the ears
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Irritability

Of course, many of these symptoms are also known side effects of medications that are commonly prescribed for the same condition.

What Treatments Should Be Considered?

and what you can do at home

Whiplash injuries can be mild or severe. Initial treatment typically includes over-the-counter pain relievers and ice applied to the painful neck muscles. However, many emergency rooms prescribe narcotics in an effort to avoid undertreating pain. Early rehabilitation is emphasized to help reduce the development of chronic pain syndrome, which describes symptoms that remain more than 3-6 months after the initial trauma occurred. Motion and use are helpful.

Some have created categories of whiplash: Whiplash can be categorized as grade 0 being no pain to grade 4 with a cervical bone fracture or dislocation. Grade 4 requires admission to hospital while grade 0-3 can be managed as outpatients. The treatments, such as motion mentioned above, assume there has been no fracture or dislocation.

In contrast to popular media portrayal, current research supports that active mobilization – including physical therapy exercises and postural modifications – rather than a soft collar are most effective in treating whiplash pain. This results in a more prompt recovery both in the short- and long-term perspective.

Passive treatments such as acupuncture, massage therapy, natural pain-relieving remedies, and stimulation may sometimes be used as a complement to active exercises. A return to normal activities of daily living should be encouraged as soon as possible to maximize and expedite full recovery.

To read about more causes of shoulder and neck pain, click here to read our helpful blog!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE
  • FDA-REGISTERED
  • PARABEN-FREE
  • 3RD PARTY TESTED
  • 100% NATURAL

How To Treat Heel Pain

How To Treat Heel Pain

Dr. Warner Talks Orthopedics:

heel pain & how to treat it

Heel pain can range from being a minor nuisance to nearly debilitating, changing our daily lives and activities. While this condition can be a common complaint among our patients, there are a number of causes of this discomfort, and treatment must be directed at the specific cause.

One of the most common causes of heel pain is plantar fasciitis, often occurring along with a heel ‘spur’. This bony prominence is located under the calcaneus, or heel bone. Heel spurs alone can be painless, but are often associated with a painful inflammation of the tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot, connecting the heel bone to the forefoot.

The spur itself is a calcium deposit, and can often be seen on x-ray. This deposit takes many months or years to appear, and is usually related to repetitive stress and strain on foot ligaments, particularly in athletes engaging in running and jumping, but obesity and the excessive weight can play a role. The plantar fascia is a thick connective tissue running from the calcaneus to the ball of the foot, and is very important in the mechanics of our foot movement and transmitting weight. If this tissue becomes inflamed, known as plantar fasciitis, it causes a painful heel/foot, often worse in the early morning upon waking (often a sharp, sticking pain), with some improvement throughout the day as it is stretched out, and returning after long periods of standing or walking. This pain is often described as a “stone bruise.”

If the pain is unresolved, the physician may consider injecting the area with an anti-inflammatory medication such as Ketolorac (Toradol) and Lidocaine, an anesthetic agent. Steroid injections, such as Cortisone, should be avoided due to risk of plantar fascial rupture and other side effects.commonly be found in people with no symptoms at all. Therefore, treatment is only needed when the spur is symptomatic and related to fasciitis, inflammation, and pain.

During your assessment, your doctor will examine the foot, and potentially request x-rays of the foot in order to delineate between other causes of heel pain, including Achilles tendinitis, stress fractures, a compressed nerve, tarsal tunnel syndrome, or retrocalcaneal bursitis. Your physician will then determine how best to treat the pain. Treatment can range from non-invasive attempts to reduce stress on the ligaments to injections or even to surgery.

 

Initial Treatment Options

your doctor may recommend

Rest – this helps alleviate the inflammation and pain.

Ice – helps to control pain.

NSAIDS/Anti-inflammatory medications (Advil/Aleve/Tylenol) – to control pain.

Exercises/stretching/physical therapy – relax the tissues around the heel bone and improve pain.

Shoe inserts/orthotic devices – help decrease pain with activity and improve foot mechanics.

Night splinting – keeps the heel stretched during sleep and less painful upon waking.

PRP Injections – A natural method of treatment using your own blood to promote healing.

If other methods have not been beneficial, the orthopedic surgeon may consider releasing this tight plantar fascia, in a plantar fascial release, and removing the spur, if present.

Click here to read about some of the most common causes of foot and ankle pain!

Occasionally heel pain may come from a hip rotation problem or even a spinal nerve compression. Read more about her unique methodology on our About page!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE
  • FDA-REGISTERED
  • PARABEN-FREE
  • 3RD PARTY TESTED
  • 100% NATURAL

5 Quick Tips To Naturally Reduce Your Back Pain

5 Quick Tips To Naturally Reduce Your Back Pain

Reduce Your Back Pain At Home -

and when you need to see a doctor

Back pain can take a serious toll on your day-to-day life. It can keep you from exercising, lifting things like groceries, and even sleeping comfortably. The good news is that most back pain can be alleviated safely and naturally at home without serious interventions – allowing you to get back to your normal life quickly.

Things You Can Do To Prevent Back Pain:

don't wait until back pain strikes - prevent it.

Exercise regularly. Maintaining core strength is a great way to prevent back pain from happening in the first place. Yoga is an ideal way to gently strengthen your core and improve your back’s stability! If you don’t think you’re cut out for a daily yoga practice, read our blog about why yoga is beneficial at any age or level of activity. 

Reduce inflammation. At the root of many back problems is inflammation. Avoid inflammatory foods like sugar, highly processed foods, refined carbohydrates, and excessive consumption of alcohol. 

Also consider taking a supplement that will reduce inflammation and improve joint function. Dr. Warner’s CBD Multivitamin is designed to improve your overall musculoskeletal health and prime your immune system for ideal performance. 

Things You Can Do To Relieve Back Pain

after it strikes

But what happens when you’re already experiencing back pain and it’s too late to do anything to prevent it? While taking steps to reduce inflammation and improve core stability (under the guidance of your doctor) can relieve pain that’s already happening, there are some additional steps you can take as well.

Limited Bed Rest. You’ve probably heard this advice before, but there is a reason for that – it’s often very effective in reducing back pain! You have to be sure to really rest your back – but don’t overdo it. These days, most doctors advise using bed rest only when necessary – because weak muscles can actually make your back problems worse. Most physicians recommend that one rest for only a day to three days. Muscle soreness often is the worst on about day 3 from a strain. Waiting too long to begin activity can allow the muscles to weaken and scar tissue to set in as ligaments and tendons become contracted. This makes recovery even harder.

Cold/Hot Therapy. Consider alternating ice compresses with heat packs. Cold reduces inflammation by restricting blood flow, and heat helps the muscles relax and can reduce pain. Warmth can allow for more superficial blood flow and this can support healing too.

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Alternative Therapies. Under the guidance of your physician, you may consider trying some alternative therapies for your back pain. Therapeutic massage can relieve tension in the muscles and reduce pain. Acupuncture or chiropractic adjustments are often helpful in relieving mild back pain symptoms as well. Cupping is a therapy technique that allows for more blood to enter the area of pain as well. Pairing alternative therapies with over the counter natural anti-inflammatory medicines can often help relieve pain and get you back to your regular activities.

Curating an anti-inflammatory diet filled with all the necessary vitamins and minerals your body needs to heal and recover is a great way to maintain your day-to-day health. Try out the recipes on our cooking show – and learn how every ingredient works together to reduce inflammation and improve your overall well-being from Well Theory’s founder, Dr. Meredith Warner. 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

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