3 Things You Can Do This Weekend to Have a Better Workweek

3 Things You Can Do This Weekend to Have a Better Work Week

3 Quick Tips

to reduce stress & prepare for a better work week!

When life gets busy or stressful, it can be difficult to stay focused and productive during your work week. Here are three simple tips that you can accomplish on your weekend that can help you prepare for your work week ahead:

1. Set your weekly goals.
A little planning each weekend can go a long way in setting the foundation for a productive, stress-free week.

Don’t make this an overwhelming list. A list with too many daily tasks can actually have the opposite effect. Instead of pushing you forward in productivity, you may feel daunted by your workload.

Rather than creating a mountain of work for yourself, make note of six daily tasks to accomplish in order of priority. Come Monday, work your way through this list. At the end of your day, write down six more tasks for the following day. Continue this pattern each day.

2. Practice decluttering.
Clean up your workspace so that you can start your workweek free from unnecessary distractions. Organize your desk. Delete and archive old files and emails. Consolidate the items on your desktop. Be ready to start the day off strong when Monday rolls around.

This doesn’t have to stop at your workspace, either! Taking care of chores around the home – from laundry to throwing out trash and excess clutter – can help to organize both your physical space and emotional headspace.

Create A Routine

and plan ahead

3. Put together meals and clothes for the week ahead.
Take some time during your weekend to plan meals and outfits for your workweek. Having this organized ahead of schedule can help to save you time in the mornings before work and give you one less task to focus on as you start your day.

In addition, preparing your meals the weekend before can help you to make healthier, more economical choices throughout your week. Prepare nutritious meals and package them the weekend before to easily grab before heading to work for the day. This will save you money and unnecessary additional calories that you would spend by ordering lunch during the day.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter

To miss fewer days at work and avoid illness, consider including these immunity-boosting foods in your regular diet.

Focusing your week doesn’t have to start on Monday morning! These tips can help you to get ahead of schedule and still leave you time to relax and enjoy your weekend. Start Monday off on the right foot – organized, stress-free, and ready to go.

At Well Theory, we believe that the keys to a healthy, balanced life are maintaining physical health, managing stress, growing and nurturing mindful relationships, and sustaining meaningful work. For more tips and products for a healthy, balanced lifestyle, read our other resources today!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE
  • FDA-REGISTERED
  • PARABEN-FREE
  • 3RD PARTY TESTED
  • 100% NATURAL

The Science Behind How You Heal

The Science Behind How You Heal

How you heal

an orthopedic surgeon's perspective

Hi, Dr. Meredith Warner here –

As an orthopedic surgeon, I not only specialize in surgical procedures – but also have to be an expert in the process of healing. Surgery is simply a means to the end – and the goal of each procedure is healing and the promotion of better form and function. I’d like to share a little bit of what I know about the physical process of healing with you today:

There are four main phases of healing that are universal and generally follow the same pattern and timing no matter what. If there is variation, that is when there are problems. Diabetics, for example, have differences in timing between the four phases of healing, which makes their wounds heal slower or become chronic.

Connective tissue is the stuff that puts a human together and makes the body “stick” together – not just tendons and ligaments. Connective tissue can be bone, ligament, nerves, muscles, tendons and the matrix (surrounding gel/fluid) that holds the cells in place. Its universality throughout the structures of the body serves as a reminder for the interconnectedness of the healing cycle.

When a connective tissue is injured, the collagen must be reformed and the structure of the material (skin, tendon, ligament, etc.) must be re-formed. The human body uses a four-step process that reliably achieves these goals if the environment is right.

The four phases of healing are hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation and remodeling.

Stage One:

Hemostasis

Just after an injury, the body is in a default mode to protect and survive. If, for example, an injury results in bleeding, the body stops the bleeding in an effort to preserve the tissue and save energy for possible fight or flight. The body does this primarily through the process of clotting.

A clot is a clump of platelets and inflammatory cells that are the first to arrive at the site of injury. They are called to the area by a complicated system of signals released into the bloodstream as soon as an injury occurs. At the scene of the wound, be it a cut, laceration, contusion, burn, chemical exposure, tear or anything, the platelets bind the exposed collagen of that tissue within the extracellular matrix. Once bound, the platelets begin to work.

Platelets are magical fragments of cells in the blood stream with awesome healing capacity. These begin to immediately secrete sphingosine-1-phosphate, thrombospondin, fibronectin, von Willebrand factor.

These then stimulate even more platelet action, promoting a release of clotting factors, which stop the bleeding – by causing a matrix of fibrin to develop that acts as a plug. This stable clot/plug then acts as a bed for substances and cells flowing into the wound, because the platelets in a clot also secrete growth factors that are integral to the next steps in healing.

Once these are released by platelets into the wound environment, other cells like neutrophils and macrophages enter the zone. PDGF recruits cells that form fibrin (fibroblasts) and then collagen begins to be deposited – beginning the tissue repair process.

Also read: Why You Should Consider a Multivitamin Before Surgery.

Stage Two:

Inflammation

The hemostasis phase starts immediately after an injury and overlaps with the inflammatory phase of healing. The inflammatory phase should only last a few days. If it persists, then chronic inflammation results and then chronic non-healing or poorly healing tissue is the outcome. For now, we will focus on a normal inflammatory phase of healing.

At the core of the healing process – and any process that occurs in the body – is something called the Endocannabinoid System, or ECS. The ECS governs each “task” your body undergoes – from triggering healing, the sensation of hunger, the sensation of pain, and especially the onset of inflammation.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter

An overeager inflammatory response is often the root cause of many conditions. While it has its place in the context of healing, sometimes the ECS can be overloaded and promotes inflammation for longer than it is necessary, causing problems. Here is how inflammation is supposed to work, when the ECS is promoting a proper inflammatory response:


There is a group of signalling molecules in the bloodstream known as the ‘complement’ system. The complement system is activated at the time of the inflammatory phase. The system brings mediators that control the ‘leakiness’ of the surrounding blood vessels and also brings chemotactic factors. These in turn attract white blood cells (leukocytes) withing 24-48 hours after the injury.

The ECS System

and how it impacts inflammation

There is a group of signalling molecules in the bloodstream known as the ‘complement’ system. The complement system is activated at the time of the inflammatory phase. The system brings mediators that control the ‘leakiness’ of the surrounding blood vessels and also brings chemotactic factors. These in turn attract white blood cells (leukocytes) withing 24-48 hours after the injury.

Mast cells ( a type of leukocyte) appear as well and release granules filled with histamine. This is what causes what we think of clinically as inflammation. Mast cells and histamines are directly responsible for the redness, warmth, heat and pain of inflammation. Basically, the “leakiness” of the blood vessels in the region is increased by histamines and that allows for more healing and building cells to reach the zone of injury.

One of these cells is the neutrophil. Neutrophils remove bad things from the wound; they act to remove pathogens, damaged matrix, dead cells and ferign material. Neutrophils do this by phagocytosis; this is literally the ‘eating’ of the bad stuff. These are early and aggressive cells that begin the process of healing.

Next, monocytes and lymphocytes enter. These become macrophages. Macrophages are the workhorses of the demolition process, because they remove remaining dead and damaged tissues. The macrophages are more selective and powerful than the neutrophils and they do a more ordered and detailed “clean-up” of the damaged tissues.

Macrophages are also important because these cells also produce more healing factors. All of these growth factors and cytokines from macrophages act to cause the fibroblasts (fiber forming cells) to grow along with smooth muscle and endothelial cells. Endothelial cells are lining cells for vessels and skin.

Once the macrophages have finished cleaning up the injury site and started the healing and rebuilding process by providing the building blocks, they actually then remove the neutrophils – the cells that clean up debris and are one of the first cells that reach the injury. As these cells are removed, the proliferation phase begins.

Stage Three:

Proliferation

The proliferation phase is the actual construction phase of the tissue. Here is where the connective tissue is made whole again.

The fibrin and fibrin matrix that was produced at the inflammatory phase is merely a scaffold for the actual tissue. It is ‘granulation’ tissue and must be converted to the actual tissue needed; this may be smooth skin, strong tendons and ligaments, muscle or bone. The fibrin is replaced by collagen. This process usually starts on day 2 or 3 after the injury or surgery.

Proliferation involves angiogenesis (forming of new blood vessels), tissue granulation, re-epithelialization (formation of skin) and wound contraction (making a wound small).

The formation of new blood vessels is important because without blood nothing can heal. Blood brings oxygen and nutrition. Blood also allows for the efficient removal of waste. Different growth factors are released that signal for this process to happen.

The growth factors that are released also stimulate fibroblasts, which start the process of skin production. Skin building cells called keratinocytes flow to the injury site through the bloodstream and enter from the edges of the wound. Fibroblasts come from bone marrow when they respond to the chemical signals released during the inflammatory phase. These produce a matrix that allows for tissue to build. The matrix is made of proteins like collagen, fibronectin and hyaluronan. The fibroblasts are stimulated to produce by the PDGF and EGF that the macrophages make.

Some fibroblasts will turn into ‘myofibroblasts’. These have a muscular component and will literally pull the edges of the wound together to make it smaller as it heals.

Stage Four:

Remodeling

Wound remodeling is the last phase of healing. It usually starts at week 2 or 3 and can last up to a year in some cases. In this phase the tissue matures and becomes its true self. 

Weaker collagen is replaced by stronger collagen. Disorganized tissue becomes organized. The organization process is regulated by the fibroblasts that secrete an enzyme that degrades the collagen matrix of the wound bed and allows for the realignment of that collagen into organized networks. That organization is modified by stress, load, pressure, gravity and other mechanical and chemical forces. 

The key to good wound repair is the remodeling and re-organization of the extracellular matrix of the damaged tissue – how well it was constructed during the earlier phases of healing. This is why it is so important to make sure that you allow your body plenty of rest during this time, only undergoing physical therapy if advised to do so by your physician. Good nutrition is also key to making sure your body advances through the four phases of healing properly.

 

Prevent Chronic Inflammation

for proper healing

If the injury or condition goes without proper treatment, or if you have some underlying condition that makes you more prone to inflammation, you can experience chronic inflammation – which does more harm than good. chronic inflammation results and then chronic non-healing or poorly healing tissue is the outcome.

This is why ensuring you have a foundation of good nutrition and overall wellness is essential for your recovery process – from surgery or any other procedure. I recommend starting a supplement regimen to all my patients before their treatments, especially those that require surgery. Nutrition provides the building blocks for all functions of the body – and is especially important for recovery after an injury or surgery.

I developed my multivitamin with all the essential nutrients we commonly miss out on in our diets – and included Full Spectrum CBD powder in my formulation. CBD has been making waves in the medical and scientific communities for its powerful anti-inflammatory properties, making it a game changer for achieving full-body wellness.

 
ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE
  • FDA-REGISTERED
  • PARABEN-FREE
  • 3RD PARTY TESTED
  • 100% NATURAL

7 Easy Ways to Improve Joint Health

7 Easy Ways to Improve Joint Health

Habits to Improve Joint Function

easily & at home

Joint pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal complaints of U.S. adults who seek out the care of an orthopedic doctor. Joint discomfort can affect a person’s quality of life by preventing them from performing even the most basic tasks – such as walking, using their hands and arms to write, play sports, or pick up light objects such as groceries. 

Joint pain is something that typically gets worse if left untreated, so if you are experiencing joint pain, you should seek out the care of a physician before it gets any worse.

If your pain is slight, or you want to improve joint function before you begin experiencing pain, you can try these 7 at-home tips & tricks to naturally promote joint health:

1. Eat Anti-Inflammatory Foods.

At the root of joint pain is inflammation. Inflammation is the body’s response to trauma, but sometimes, your body can over-produce inflammation and do more harm than good. Flavonoids, the phytonutrients (plant chemicals) found in most fruits and vegetables, are thought to be naturally anti-inflammatory.

Tip: Colorful fruits and vegetables, such as cherries, oranges, broccoli, and more are rich in this natural anti-inflammatory phytonutrients.

2. Avoid Inflammatory Foods.

Try to avoid overly processed foods, sugar, and alcohol. Simple carbohydrates, like processed breads, and desserts like cake, cookies, and ice cream should be eaten in limited portions if at all. These foods can lead to increased inflammation, which could be contributing to your joint pain.

Caffeine can also contribute to inflammation – so cut back on your coffee habit and replace soda with water. To start your morning, try naturally decaffeinated teas, or warm water with lemon and other fresh fruit. Your joints will thank you!

The time to start a supplement regimen is now

but where do you start?

3. Supplement Your Diet

It’s difficult to know which supplements you should take – and which supplements are ideal for improved joint health. Taking Vitamin D with Calcium, for example, increases the absorption rate of Calcium – which is a great supplement for improving bone health. 

Try to get out in the sun every day to naturally absorb Vitamin D and exercise, but a vitamin supplement is still a great way to make sure your body is getting all of its nutritional needs.

Dr. Warner designed an anti-inflammatory, whole body-optimizing multivitamin to take the guesswork out of taking supplements. Our CBD Multivitamin features carefully selected, high potency and bioavailable ingredients that support key areas of your health. SHOP NOW

4. Use it or Lose it.

If you’re cleared to do so by your physician, regular exercise is the best way to maintain your joint function. Regular exercise can strengthen the muscles around the joint and improve flexibility, allowing for increased function.

Low-impact exercises such as swimming, biking, or walking are great ways to improve your joint health without further damaging commonly painful joints such as the knees and hips. 

Yoga is also a great way to improve joint stability while improving core strength – and can be easily done by people of all ages and abilities.

READ MORE: WHY YOGA IS BENEFICIAL FOR EVERY AGE AND ABILITY

When you are able and under the guidance of a physician, you can also try weight or resistance band exercises to improve your muscle tone further. Even if yoga isn’t central to your joint-strengthening regimen, it’s important to stretch! Flexibility is key to maintaining joint health and relieving any soreness or stiffness that may occur after exercise.

Stretch before and after exercise to prevent muscle tightening and shortening that can put damaging strain on your joints. Even on your "off" days when you do not exercise, incorporating a stretching routine into your daily life is a simple yet effective way of improving joint function.

Focus on overall physical health

to improve the health of your joints

5. Improve Flexibility.

Increased flexibility is the goal of a focused stretching routine. Stretching will help you increase your flexibility, which will improve your joints’ range of motion. A smaller range of motion makes it difficult for your joints to move – which can lead to damage.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter

Stretching exercises, such as yoga, floor bridges, sitting toe touches, heel raises and more, are excellent and simple ways of improving flexibility. Consult with a physical therapist for even more insight on which areas of your body could benefit from increased flexibility.

6. Reach Your Weight Goals.

Consult with your physician to find out what the ideal weight should be for your height and body type. If you could stand to lose a few, those extra pounds are likely putting damaging pressure on your joints – especially your knees, ankles, and hips.

If you need to diet, focus more on what you’re replacing heavy portions and processed foods with, instead of simply cutting back. For example, trade mashed potatoes for a large bowl of broccoli. Pick wholesome, plant-heavy meals that also reduce inflammation while providing essential nutrients. You can visit our Herbal Kitchen, where we share healthy, easy recipes that include information about the nutrients in the foods you’re making, for healthy meal ideas!

Don't Neglect Your Mental Health

reducing mental stress also reduces physical stress

7. Prioritize Mental Health.

Anxiety can affect your physical body in more ways than one. It can, for example, make you grind your teeth at night – and then you wake up with a painful, stiff jaw. Make sure to carve out time for relaxation. Take your full lunch break at work. Try to sit down for every meal instead of eating on the go. Shut off screens two hours before bedtime so you have a better chance of falling asleep quickly, and getting an adequate amount of sleep.

For best results, start with one self-care routine and commit to practicing it every day for a month. By the end of the month, it’ll be a habitual part of your daily routine!

Commit to Your Long-Term Health

and healthy joints will follow

In short, there are just a few things you need to do to improve your joint health. Commit to improving your physical, mental, and emotional health. Most of us know intuitively how much and what kinds of foods we should be eating, when we’re stressed, and when we need to exercise.

Reduce bodily inflammation naturally by eating healthy foods and taking an anti-inflammatory supplement designed to support your musculoskeletal (bone + muscle + joint) health.

Exercise regularly to improve muscle tone and reduce stress. Get the right amount of sleep and try to achieve attainable, realistic weight loss goals to improve your physical health and put less stress on your body.

When forming these new habits, start slow and don’t try to do them all at once. Take all the time you need to make sure they stick, and you’ll be well on your way to a healthier lifestyle.

Use our products and resources to naturally + safely reduce inflammation and optimize your overall well-being! All of our naturally pain-relieving products contain CBD: a powerful, safe, and natural substance proven to reduce inflammation at its source. Consider our website your personal resource to a life well lived!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE
  • FDA-REGISTERED
  • PARABEN-FREE
  • 3RD PARTY TESTED
  • 100% NATURAL

What Is Endocannabinology?

What Is Endocannabinology?

Endocannabinology

& how you can use it to restore hormonal balance

In the medical field, the “study of” something is usually coined with the suffix “-ology.” We have all heard of neurology, pulmonology, etc. – and as CBD is becoming more accepted by the medical community, the study of its effects have been classified as “endocannabinology.”

CBD exerts its effects by engaging with your body’s built in endocannabinoid system. This is a complex system that regulates everything that happens in your body, from breathing to hormone regulation, immunity, to your body’s temperature, your mood, and more. An endocannabinoid system that is finely tuned and in perfect balance will keep you in optimal health.

The study of the function - and sometimes, dysfunction - of this system, and all the ways different medications, supplements, and herbs can affect is, all fall under the umbrella term of “endocannabinology.” CBD features heavily in this field due to the fact that it is one of the most impactful substances regarding the endocannabinoid system.

But many other things impact this regulatory system, and not all in a good way. Our environment – stress, exposure to certain chemicals like exhaust fumes, the amount of sleep or exercise we get, genetic makeup and even the food we eat can all knock the endocannabinoid system off-balance.

Inflammation:

the root of dysfunction

The root of Endocannabinoid Dysfunction Syndrome or endocannabinoid imbalance is typically inflammation. Inflammatory foods, injuries, environments, and more compound into a variety of conditions. Our bodies combat this inflammation by trying to maintain balance. Endocannabinoids are integral to balance optimization of all systems, especially the immune system.

Our cells signal to each other. For instance, when muscle tissue gets damaged if you bump into the corner of a table, those damaged cells signal for an inflammatory response. This causes pain, so you don’t damage the area further by misusing it. The response causes swelling, which protects the damaged tissue and brings in more healing and inflammatory proteins. The response ultimately causes healing. 

Behind this process is the network known as the endocannabinoid system. When this system is overloaded, however, it struggles to respond to these signals appropriately. That’s where CBD comes in. You can read more about CBD by reading this helpful blog!

How The Endocannabinoid system works

Our bodies make endocannabinoids, or the ligands (key-like molecules) that bind to cannabinoid receptors. The formation and elimination of cannabinoids happens constantly in the human body. Billions are made daily. The system of processing requires significant amounts of Omega-3 and Omega-6 and other essential fatty acids. When we don’t eat enough foods with these essential fatty acids, the entire system suffers. 

Phytocannabinoids, like CBD or its better-known cousin, THC (the compound responsible for the “high” from marijuanna) are able to mimic certain endocannabinoids or bind to endocannabinoid receptors in the body to help regulate levels of neurotransmitters involved in pain, lymphocyte and immune function, circulation and other systems.

CBD also binds to or influences the CB1 receptor, PPAR, TRV, and other receptor targets. Its effects impact the serotonin system, opioid system, and others. It is so effective with regard to seizure activity in the brain that the FDA has approved a CBD-based medication, called Epidiolex, after studies and trials analyzing CBD’s known anticonvulsant properties.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter

Endocannabinology is a young medical science, which means that there is much more to be discovered. Believe it or not, this important human system was not even fully described until the 1980s due to government regulation and prohibitions on the science. Epidiolex is the first of many approved pharmaceutical-grade and insurance-covered (sometimes) drugs that will be approved as our understanding of the endocannabinoid system, and the methods we can use to affect it, grows.

CBD in Medicine:

current research

In the meantime, however, studies have shown that you can affect your endocannabinoid system with almost every decision you make – the food you eat, the exercise you get, the vitamins you take, and more. While cannabidiol is one of the most versatile phytocannabinoids that can interact with your body, nutrition gives your body the building blocks it needs to thrive. It requires natural, whole foods in a well-balanced diet to create new cells. Healthy fats, like the Omega-3’s and Omega-6’s mentioned earlier, are especially important in this process.

Like many effective medications, CBD is not meant to provide a solution to every problem or imbalance in your body – it is supposed to work in conjunction with a balanced lifestyle. 

At Well Theory, we’re invested in helping you learn how to live well. Check out the rest of our blog for more healthy living tips, our Herbal Kitchen cooking show for easy, wholesome recipes, and our surgeon-designed CBD products to give your life the boost it needs to achieve optimal wellness!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE
  • FDA-REGISTERED
  • PARABEN-FREE
  • 3RD PARTY TESTED
  • 100% NATURAL

Start Cooking with CBD Oil

Start Cooking with CBD Oil

How To Cook With CBD

use these tips to incorporate CBD into your daily life:

CBD has been taking the medical and wellness communities by storm, and that has resulted in a rapid influx of commercially-made products – from vitamins, to gummies, ingestible oils, and even cosmetics, CBD has arrived on the commercial market and it’s here to stay.

More people are choosing to include CBD products in their daily routines as supplements, but what if you could incorporate it into something you do every day – by using it in your meals? While it does take longer to feel the effects of CBD when it’s eaten, the effects are known to last longer. The ingredients in edibles are released slowly into the system as it is digested, and remain steady over the course of digestion.

CBD oil is most often used in edibles. These oils are usually Full Spectrum, which means they contain all the beneficial compounds of the industrial hemp plant, including trace (legal) amounts of THC or Broad Spectrum, which contains all the beneficial compounds except THC. CBD is one of the many naturally-occurring chemical compounds found in the flowers and leaves of cannabis plants.

Unlike THC (the psychoactive element of cannabis,) CBD cannot get you high. It does, however, have proven anti-inflammatory, pain-fighting, and anxiety-reducing properties.

When small doses are taken daily, a slow, natural, and steady return to hormonal balance and overall well-being can occur. Including CBD in a ritual you complete at one to three times a day is a great way to get the dosage you need – without interrupting your daily routines.

How To Cook With CBD

The first thing you have to remember when cooking with CBD is that you shouldn’t actually “cook” it in the traditional sense. CBD has been shown to lose its efficacy when it’s heated. Therefore, it is not recommended as a cooking oil – you should not use it while sauteing, baking, boiling, or frying anything that requires it to be heated over 350 degrees Fahrenheit. CBD will begin to break down and evaporate anywhere from 320-350 degrees, so while you can heat it somewhat, it is not recommended. CBD oil is commonly described as an “earthy” tasting olive oil that gets more bitter when heated – so be careful with how much you use and how much you heat it.

It’s best used as a finishing oil or in dishes that don’t require heating to be prepared – such as smoothies, pestos, and salad dressings.

Cannabinoids bind well to fat and oil-based ingredients - so use it with some sort of grease or fat. This way, you can take full advantage of the benefits in your CBD oil.

Less Is More

Again, CBD is not psychoactive and has few, if any, negative side effects. Even so, it is important to start with smaller doses to see how you respond – and consult with your physician to make sure it will not interact with any medications you are taking.

Because CBD is a supplement and not a heavily standardized medication, some trial and error is necessary – your experience will be different from anyone else’s. 

Thankfully, CBD is a forgiving compound. Just remember that less is more, especially if you are new to supplementing with CBD.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter

Eat your way to less anxiety! Find out how CBD can relieve symptoms and stress by reading our helpful blog.

At Well Theory, we pride ourselves in creating some of the most high-quality CBD products on the market. Each of our products was personally curated by an orthopedic surgeon, and is made in an FDA-approved facility + cGMP certified. They have also been tested in a 3rd party lab, and you can find those results right here.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.

100% NATURAL PAIN RELIEF FOR PEOPLE WORLDWIDE
  • FDA-REGISTERED
  • PARABEN-FREE
  • 3RD PARTY TESTED
  • 100% NATURAL

Balancing Your Endocannabinoid System

Balancing Your Endocannabinoid System

Why You Need to Balance Your Endocannabinoid System

When your body isn’t in balance, it can wreak havoc on your life, emotions, and overall well-being. At Well Theory, we provide resources, products, education and more to help you achieve balance in your life through small lifestyle changes.

If you don’t feel 100% your best, physiologic imbalance is likely at the core of your struggles. An unbalanced immune system, overeager inflammatory response, chaotic hormonal system and more can impact your overall wellness and outlook on life.

If you’ve struggled with recurring pain, inflammation, or anxiety, you’ve likely searched for a safe solution to your condition. And your search likely turned up one promising answer to your problems: Cannabidiol (CBD.)

What Homeostasis Is

and how you can maintain it

Your body naturally tries to maintain balance – think of this as when an air conditioner clicking on when the temperature gets too warm. Your body does its best to achieve and maintain homeostasis – a state of optimal balance. This includes things like maintaining a stable body temperature, keeping hormones in check, and emotional stability.

Learn how CBD can relieve stress and anxiety by reading this helpful blog!

Natural Ways To Maintain Balance

Your body achieves and maintains homeostasis by employing the Endocannabinoid system, or ECS. The ECS is a network of neurotransmitters called endocannabinoids, and receptors for these that are located everywhere throughout the body – in the brain, heart, liver and in your bones, skin, and even digestive tract. In fact, there are more of the ECS-type receptors in the human body than any other type. 

Your body naturally produces chemicals called endocannabinoids to affect these neurotransmitters and send signals to the body. These receptors regulate things like hunger, mood, inflammation, and more. This is the “eat, sleep, relax and forget” system of the body.

You can trigger your body to produce more or less cannabinoids with things such as exercise, diet, medication, supplements, and more.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter

Essentially, every function of your body is influenced by endocannabinoid receptors. CBD is a phytocannabinoid and is able to influence these receptors; it is molecularly similar to the endocannabinoids your body produces naturally.

If, for example, you begin to experience constant anxiety, your body may attempt to restore homeostasis (balance) by reducing the activity of specific receptors in the brain; therefore there is a reduced sensation of stress. In the long term, this makes it difficult for your body to maintain balance in the future, as it may err in the opposite direction. Sometimes the human body overshoots.

CBD can influence the stress response by binding to or influencing the endocannabinoid receptors - this can influence how other cannabinoids bind and exert influence, which will help your body not become overstimulated. Likewise, if you lack enough endocannabinoids, the addition of a phytocannabinoid will allow normal function of the same receptors. CBD is a great pain reliever because of its ability to influence the body’s inflammatory and nerve response, reducing pain and inflammation at injury sites, arthritic joints, and more.

Balance is not something a quick fix can achieve – you have to make holistic and consistent lifestyle changes to see results over time. This requires you to really examine your lifestyle, and make changes to things like your physical activity or diet. Using CBD is a great way to optimize your endocannabinoid system, but each person is unique and will require different therapeutic treatments to achieve optimal homeostasis. (You should not look to CBD as a ‘cure-all’ and think that making basic healthy choices is not important!)

When treating her patients, Dr. Meredith Warner uses an unconventional, patient-centric approach when developing treatment plans. If appropriate for the patient, she prefers to use natural therapies and functional recovery over invasive procedures and heavy pharmaceuticals. 

This belief is what helped her found Well Theory – your resource to a life lived vibrantly. Well Theory makes her method for achieving wellness available to you through our resources, products, and more.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Meredith Warner is the creator of Well Theory and The Healing Sole. She is a board-certified Orthopedic Surgeon and Air Force Veteran.

She is on a mission to disrupt traditional medicine practices and promote betterment physically, spiritually and mentally to many more people. She advocates for wellness and functional health over big pharma so more people can age vibrantly with more function and less pain.

At Well Theory, Our surgeon-designed products are FDA Registered and formulated to help people:

  • Manage the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain
  • Recover vibrantly from orthopedic related surgeries
  • Fill the gaps in our daily diets
  • Manage pain associated with inflammation

Surgeon Formulated
For Your Peace of Mind

Natural Ingredients + Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs.